While working alongside the UK Special Forces, I witnessed emergent leadership regularly. However, at the time, I didn’t know what it was. In this blog post, I talk about the benefits of emergent leadership, and why it’s a leadership style that suits the UK Special Forces.

Emergent leadership is a type of leadership that emerges naturally from a group, or situation rather than being imposed from the outside. It is often seen in times of crisis or change.

Emergent leadership can be a powerful tool in times of change or turbulence. When the status quo is no longer working, or traditional leadership methods are no longer effective, an emergent leader can step in and help steer the organisation in a new direction.

One of the critical benefits of emergent leadership is that it allows organisations to be more agile and responsive to change. This can be a crucial advantage in a fast-paced world where change is constant. Emergent leaders can quickly assess the situation and make decisions best suited to the current environment.

Another benefit of emergent leadership is that it fosters creativity and innovation. By allowing team members to contribute their ideas and suggestions, an emergent leader can help unleash the team’s imagination. This can lead to new and innovative ways of doing things, which can help the organisation stay ahead of the competition.

Emergent leadership can be a powerful tool for organisations facing challenging times or rapid change. By allowing team members to contribute their ideas and being flexible and adaptive, an emergent leader can help an organisation navigate difficult times and emerge stronger on the other side.

Below are the top 5 benefits of emergent leadership:

  1. Improved problem-solving and decision making
  2. Increased innovation and creativity
  3. Enhanced team performance
  4. Greater resilience in the face of change
  5. improved communication and collaboration

 

Emergent leadership is a style of leadership that is highly suitable for the UK Special Forces. It is a style that relies on the leader being able to adapt and respond quickly to changes in the situation. This is important in the Special Forces, as they often find themselves in situations where there is no clearly defined course of action. The leader must be able to improvise and produce a plan on the fly.

Emergent leadership also relies on the leader taking input from those around them and making decisions based on consensus. This, too, is important in the Special Forces, as they often work as a team and must be able to make decisions together quickly. Emergent leadership allows for quick decision-making and enables the team to adapt rapidly to changing circumstances.

Finally, emergent leadership is a democratic style of leadership. This means that it places a high value on input from those who are affected by the decisions made by the leader. Again, this is important in the Special Forces, as they often rely on teamwork and must be able to work together effectively. The democratic nature of emergent leadership helps ensure that everyone is on board with the decisions made and that there is buy-in from all team members.

If you think your organisation could benefit from improved leadership, please contact us, and we can schedule a discovery call.

 

Author: Mick Murphy